STAHL, Carol Ann

Photos Courtesy of California Historical Society, MSP 3800

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Last Name
 
STAHL
Given Names
 
Carol Ann
AKA's
 
Better known as
 
Date of Birth
 
10/28/1938
Age at Death
 
40
Place of Birth
 
Mariposa, California
Residence (US)
 
Ukiah, California 95482
Residence (JT)
 
Cottage 52
Residence (JT) Abbreviated
 
C52
Religion
 
Race
 
Caucasian
Gender
 
Female
Information on __Source of Death
 
House Foreign Affairs Committee report; FBI document 89-4286-1302 (prepared 12/78)
Body Identification Number
 
Occupation outside __Peoples Temple
 
Teacher/ School administrator
Occupation inside __Peoples Temple
 
Government Income
 
SSA (JT)
Entry in Guyana
 
Occupation at __Jonestown
 
Planning Commission (FBI document 89-4286-1207)
Birth Mother
 
Birth Father
 
Siblings
 
Partner
 
Alfred Richmond Stahl, Sr.
Children
 
Bonnie Lynn Stahl
Non-Temple Relatives
 
Family Tree
 
Discrepancies
 
Remembrances
 
“Carol Stahl was a genuinely sweet and calm member of Peoples Temple. She was always the matronly type - taking care of others. Her husband was an irascible man who often needed taming and consoling, and she took it all in stride. She moved into the Redwood Valley Peoples Temple group from the Golden Rule community in Willits, CA. That was in interesting peace-seeking rural community which did not function with members using money. I can remember at some point trying to teach decimals to some of the students who had moved in from that community, and the concept of pennies, dimes, etc. was a difficult subject for them. She was a teacher while in Peoples Temple, and was happiest after her beautiful daughter was born. She was such a proud and attentive parent. Her defense against chaos that was part of Peoples Temple, especially after the center moved from Redwood Valley to San Francisco, was to walk calmly and slowly. She would not be rushed. She would take care of business in an orderly way, calmly. Carol worked hard, never really asking for anything for herself. She was kind to each person she spoke with, never said a cruel word, and was always loving. She was generous and unselfish, and dedicated. She wanted a better life for her daughter and for the Peoples Temple family, and for the greater world around us. ” - Laura Johnston Kohl