Q415 Transcript

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(Note: This tape was transcribed by Jennifer Gibbons. The editors gratefully acknowledge her invaluable assistance.)

(Harp music, followed by organ music. Choir sings two hymns, including “Holy Holy Holy.”)

Announcer:
This worship service “Church in the Home” is brought to you each week from our radio and television chapel in Los Angeles, California. “Church in the Home” is offered as a public service across America to foreign countries and to our armed forces around the world.
(Music ends)

Announcer:
Now here is your radio and television pastor, Fred Jordan.

Fred Jordan:
Our God and our Heavenly Father, we thank thee for your son Jesus Christ who said “Suffer the little children to come unto me and forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of Heaven.” We thank thee for these precious little darlin’s that have come to us today as our guests from the far off land of [South] Korea. We pray that you’ll bless them, bless these parents who’re filled with all kinds of emotions as they receive today the new little babe that’s going to go home with them to distant states and to become their very own. In the name of that same Christ we pray. Amen.

(Soloist sings with organ accompaniment)

Fred Jordan:
Amen! Greetings to all of our friends and members of “Church in the Home” throughout this great nation of ours, and wherever you may be watching television or viewing uh, this telecast. And all you friends who will be listening today to our radio network broadcast, God bless each and every one of you. And I think it’s important that I tell you now that we have, as I indicated in my prayers, some special guests, little ones all the way from the land of Korea. And you friends who’ve prayed and who have cooperated and been so wonderful in sponsoring this one orphanage that we sponsor in Korea, are going to see the little– uh, just a little bit of the fruit of your prayers and your gifts and your efforts.

We have one of God’s angels here today. I thought a long time last night before I decided to use that expression. In our hospitals, we call our nurses “angels of mercy,” but I think if you could watch this young lady in her directing and operating this orphanage, I think you’d be like the little lady I met today who has five little babies. And she was feeling quite weary and tired, and I said, “How would you like to have 22 little babies in a crib in one room?” Well, she said, “I guess I have a lot to be thankful for.” This is the director that you sent out over four years ago to our orphanage that we built and supported there. With her, we have Willie [Jordan] back with us today, and we had a wonderful trip down at Texas, our school, but we’re glad to be back, and to have them tell you just a little bit out of their hearts about those early days in Korea when they slept on the floor, and I understand that the room was so small, and these girls are so tall that they actually had to put their feet under the bed, the bed wasn’t uh– a bed uh, long enough to sleep on, so they slept on the floor with their feet under the bed. So go on, Willie! And Lorraine Jost. God’s uh, uh, wonderful angel, uh, for the children of Korea, and Willie, God bless you. It’s wonderful to have you two girls here, and I think I’ll just let you uh, talk out of your hearts, uh, Willie uh– Tell us how this whole thing started? How you– how you and Lorraine got together, and did you actually have to sleep on the floor in the little Korean home and uh, didn’t understand the language, or something about it, and how the burden came for the orphanage?

Willie Jordan:
Well, I think Reverend Jordan, it began of course, when you went to Korea the first time, you saw such a need there, and you came back and raised several thousand dollars and sent it direct to the president of Korea, President Syngman Rhee, And then when I made a trip to the Orient to visit some of our mission stations in other parts of the Far East, you sent me to Korea. And while there, the Lord gave me a burden too for the children of Korea. And on my way back to America, I met Lorraine Jost who was then a “Church in the Home” missionary in Hawaii. But she didn’t want to be in Hawaii, she wanted to go to Korea, to take care of babies. And uh, the next time I met Lorraine, she was there in this little room, and uh, we did put our feet under the bed, didn’t we? But it wasn’t only because of the bed. Tell him what you told him this morning!

Lorraine:
Well, it was often because the floor was warm, and we didn’t have uh, enough covers and everything to keep warm. It’s cold in Korea.

Fred Jordan:
They– they heat under the floor.

Lorraine:
Yes. That’s right.

Fred Jordan:
And keep the floor warm.

Lorraine:
Radiant heating.

Fred Jordan:
Radiant heating.

Lorraine:
Mmm-hmm.

Fred Jordan:
Well, that’s what they talk about here, but we don’t have it yet. And Lorraine, it’s wonderful. We’re going to see you several times today uh, on this program, and the babies, we want you present them to the parents. I know it’s going to be a– a terrific emotional uh, hour for all of us as the parents receive these precious little dolls all the way from Korea. And I wish this was color to see those fabulous colors, white, and I guess that’s a deep uh, maroon or red, and– and uh, Willie, yours is–

Willie Jordan:
(unintelligible)–

Fred Jordan:
Gold, and– and uh–

Willie Jordan:
Well, mine is a festival dress. Lorraine’s dress is one that they actually wear– Maybe she could step out, and the camera can get a picture with the very uh, short waist and the long skirt, and this is the dress that the Korean ladies actually wear every day, whereas the dress I have on is more of a festival, or New Year’s dress.

Fred Jordan:
Well, thank you so much, girls. And now we’ll bring you back in a moment. But first, let’s listen to Harriet, uh– Oh, the choir is going to sing. I’ve been gone three weeks, so naturally I’m confused this morning with all these children. Choir, sing for us.
(Organ music. Choir sings.)

Fred Jordan:
Thank you so much, choir. Yesterday at the airport, when Lorraine Jost arrived from Korea with these four precious orphans, uh, we had a– a lot of anticipation, and we were quite anxious, because the fog had delayed the landing of the plane at the international airport, and uh, I think we still are so excited today, we just don’t know hardly what we’re doing. And then uh, the adjustment of these little uh, fellas to new parents who speak a strange language to them, and then the– the anticipation on the part of the parents, and the thrill of having these new babies they’ve waited, prayed for, longed for, has caused a great deal of emotion in all of our hearts. So if– if we make some mistakes today, well, you just bear with us, and– and uh, pray with us, because I know you’re all going to be thrilled uh, when you meet some of these uh, wonderful parents. Uh– We have Mrs. and Mr. Owens here today, and I’m going to ask them to come now and uh, we want to find out why they wanted an orphan from Korea. I wonder if you’ll come, Mrs. Owens and Mr. Owens, God bless you. We welcome you to the “Church in the Home,” and Mr. Owens. And uh, what is your name, doll?

Rachel Owens:
Rachel.

Fred Jordan:
Rachel! That’s a Bible name, isn’t it? I wish you could’ve been at the airport to see this precious little doll yesterday, and uh, what was that you– you gave to the little orphan? A doll? And she was just like a little mother. Now I wonder if we can start first. Mr. Owens, what is your uh, profession?

Mr. Owens:
I’m an accountant.

Fred Jordan:
An accountant! And uh, this is your own flesh and blood?

Mr. Owens:
Own flesh and blood.

Mrs. Owens:
That’s right.

Fred Jordan:
She’s not adopted.

Mr. Owens:
No.

Fred Jordan:
Now– now why uh, why would you want a little baby in your home? Huh?

Rachel:
I like them.

Fred Jordan:
You like ‘em! Well, a lot of people like ‘em, but they cost money to support, I found that out at our house. Uh– How– How about you, Dad? Uh– Why did you want another child?

Mr. Owens:
Well, because Jesus loves all the little children, faith in the children of the world, and we wanted another one for a sister–

Fred Jordan:
A companion, huh?

Mr. Owens:
And a companion, and also for the sharing of God’s love with some child who is not as fortunate as the children in America.

Fred Jordan:
Now uh, Mrs. Owens, uh, how about you as– as a mother? Uh, uh, what prompted you in your heart to go along about the adoption of another child?

Mrs. Owens:
Well, we’ve tried for a good many years to do this, and this just was the only way open, that we wanted some– another child in our home, rather than to raise one alone.

Fred Jordan:
Oh, I– I know that uh, your hearts are anxious, and uh, the thrill and joy of seeing this couple yesterday waiting as if they were going to receive something from a– a satellite or from Mars or the moon, and yet it’s so intangible, because they’ve never actually had anything but a picture of your baby, had you?

Mr. Owens:
No.

Mrs. Owens:
That’s right.

Fred Jordan:
And we’re so happy you’re here. Where are you from? What state?

Mr. Owens:
Clarinda, Iowa.

Fred Jordan:
Clarinda, Iowa? And uh, how large a place is that?

Mr. Owens:
Population between five and six thousand.

Fred Jordan:
Five and six thousand. And you came out here just to receive your child?

Mr. Owens:
That’s true.

Fred Jordan:
Oh, that’s wonderful, and we’re so glad. What are you going to call your little girl?

Mr. Owens:
Lorna Jean.

Fred Jordan:
Lorna Jean. That’s American name.

Mr. Owens:
It’s an American name.

Mrs. Owens:
That’s right.

Fred Jordan:
Oh, that’s wonderful. You’re a Christian people–

Mrs. Owens:
That’s right.

Fred Jordan:
–active in church work–

Mrs. Owens:
Yes.

Fred Jordan:
–oh, that’s wonderful. We sure– certainly thank God for ya, and uh, we know that you’re going to have a real thrill when we present that little baby. We’ll do that in just a few minutes, uh, to all you parents, but first now I want us to listen to the harp as Harriet plays.
(Harriet play the harp, with organ accompaniment)

Fred Jordan:
Thank you, Harriet. And you know, when Jesus picked up that little baby in His arms, and said of such is the Kingdom of Heaven, I think there must’ve been some rejoicing in Heaven. And I’m sure that there was yesterday when this plane arrived with these little babies from Korea, and their parents were there ready to greet them. And one of the parents came here from Denver, Colorado, uh, Mrs. Braden. And she’s our guest today, and she’s going to receive a little baby to take home to her husband and the family back in Denver. And so all you friends in Denver, uh, get on the phone right now and call your neighbors and tell them to tune in and maybe you’ll know Mrs. Braden, your neighbor. Mrs. Braden, will you come here to the pulpit? And I want to find out why you wanted this little baby from Korea. Uh– First of all, uh, you’re married–

Mrs. Braden:
Yes, sir.

Fred Jordan:
–and you have a husband–

Mrs. Braden:
Yes.

Fred Jordan:
And what does your husband do?

Mrs. Braden:
He’s in the real estate business.

Fred Jordan:
Real estate business.

Mrs. Braden:
Mm-hmm.

Fred Jordan:
Now do you work?

Mrs. Braden:
No, I’m a housewife.

Fred Jordan:
You’re a housewife. Well, that’ll be wonderful. You have any children?

Mrs. Braden:
Uh– No.

Fred Jordan:
No children.

Mrs. Braden:
I have one now! (Laughs)

Fred Jordan:
You have one now! (Laughs) You’re going to have one in a few minutes. We’re going to give you one from Korea. Now what– what prompted you to uh, uh, contact us about uh, uh, adopting a child from our orphanage?

Mrs. Braden:
Well, in your paper– Of course, you featured them every now and then, and a lady from our church who receives your paper gave us the information.

Fred Jordan:
Oh, it’s probably like this paper here that’s uh–

Mrs. Braden:
Yes. Uh–

Fred Jordan:
(unintelligible word) orphans, or something like that?

Mrs. Braden:
Yes.

Fred Jordan:
Well, we’ll be happy for folks to get a copy. It’ll tell them about the orphanage work, and uh, then you corresponded with us–

Mrs. Braden:
We wrote right away, and we’ve just been anxious ever since to hear.

Fred Jordan:
Well, the people that sponsor these orphans in our orphanages in Japan and Korea, they’re anxious that they become Christians and reared in Christian homes. You and Mr. Braden Christian people?

Mrs. Braden:
Oh yes.

Fred Jordan:
And you’ll believe in the Lord with all your heart?

Mrs. Braden:
I certainly do.

Fred Jordan:
You intend to bring up the child that way?

Mrs. Braden:
Oh, definitely.

Fred Jordan: Now what do you think about this problem of uh, mixed blooded children being in your community?

Mrs. Braden:
(Pause) Well, I don’t know, I don’t– it doesn’t make any difference to us, and I’m sure that as they grow older, that they will be Americans just like anyone else. I think they’ll be accepted.

Fred Jordan: Bless your heart, those tears are coming. And we’re going to find out uh, in just a moment from our director’s sister, who adopted a child over a year ago from Korea, a mixed-blooded child, and we’re going to ask her personally how the community receives a mixed-blood child in her community. And so I think that’ll help answer your question, and uh, so don’t be nervous now, everything’ll be all right, and uh, it won’t be long until we’ll present that child. As soon as we interview another one of the parents or the couples that’re going to receive two children. But now I want you to listen to our trio as they sing for us.
(Organ music. Trio sings.)

Fred Jordan:
Thank you, girls. Nice to see you girls again. And now we have a minister and his wife here from back East, and uh, we’re so happy to have them receive two children from our orphanage today. And uh, I want them to come right now, Mr. and Mrs. Jones. God bless you. Mrs. Jones, I under– God bless you, Mr.– Reverend Jones, and I understand that uh, you’re a registered nurse.

Marceline Jones:
Yes, I am.

Fred Jordan:
Is that right?

Marceline Jones:
That’s right.

Fred Jordan:
Well, Lorraine Jost our director is a– a registered nurse, and I know that’s going to be a big help with those children.

Marceline Jones:
Yes, it has been already.

Fred Jordan:
Don’t you kind of uh, uh, spend part of your time ministering to the sick?

Marceline Jones:
Yes, uh, our church has a nursing home, a home for the aged, and I work as administrator–

Fred Jordan:
Well, isn’t that wonderful!

Marceline Jones:
–in an advisory capacity (unintelligible under Jordan) very much.

Fred Jordan:
Uh, uh, this pastor and his– his uh, church uh, and his lovely wife uh, uh, operate a– a home for the aged, isn’t that right?

Marceline Jones:
That’s right.

Fred Jordan:
And the needy, and we’re so glad, and– and Mr.– uh, uh, I want to call you uh, Long, but it’s Jones. I don’t know why I want to call you Reverend Long, but uh, uh, I wonder if you could give us just a little of your background, how you got into uh, the–the ministry, and something about your church, we’re interested in, and uh, your work back there. Surely your hands are full! This lady directs a home for the aged, and her husband has a church, and he operates it without salary, he receives no salary. Is that right?

Jim Jones:
Correct.

Fred Jordan:
And you make, uh, you– you have your other income from other sources? And so, how did you get into all of this, and now you want two babies?

Jim Jones:
Just a desire to help people primarily is the reason. We’ve had a great interest in breaking down barriers between all races and nations and creeds, and that’s the primary reason, Brother Jordan, we have uh, entered into the field.

Fred Jordan:
I see.

Jim Jones:
We’ve certainly been pleased to come in contact with your work. We might say when that we were looking for children, we went to different agencies, and all of them had such fabulous prices connected with the adoption part, and your agency had no charge, it was just merely the transportation of the children, and you were interested in the welfare of the human being. We felt we wanted to tell that to the television audience.

Fred Jordan:
Well, thank you so much. Uh– We didn’t ask for that, but we certainly appreciate it, because people just imagine that it’s black market, and you’re making a fabulous sum of money. And uh, you know why we want to adopt children? We want them to have a normal home, that’s one thing.

Jim Jones:
(unintelligible word)

Fred Jordan:
Especially with uh, Christian parents, and love, but we also want another thing. We want to vacate our orphanage as fast as we can, to receive those who are dying on the streets, and that are taken to the city hall, ten or fifteen a day, the city hall there in Seoul, Korea, no place to go. And all the orphanages are full and running over and beyond capacity, and your taking two will make it possible for us uh, to receive some more orphanages– uh, orphans.

Jim Jones:
That’s right.

Fred Jordan:
And it’s so wonderful to have you here, and we’ll put those two little babies in your arms in just a– a few minutes.

Jim Jones:
Thank you so much, Brother Jordan.

Fred Jordan:
And we got a little more time, (unintelligible name)? I– I wonder uh, if we can just have a– a little testimony of your experience. When did you find Christ as your savior?

Jim Jones:
Six years ago I found Him, as I was pastoring a formal church, and I was– I was the pastor, but I was converted in my own church.

Fred Jordan:
You mean– (Laughs) You mean you was the pastor and you was converted–

Jim Jones:
Yes, I was born again in my own church–

Fred Jordan:
–after you were uh, preaching to others?

Jim Jones:
After I had– After I had been assigned to my congregation. I did not know about the new birth.

Fred Jordan:
Well, I don’t know whether we should say this or not, but uh, well, most of the churches are in session today, at this time, you know – we’re on about a hundred television stations – so maybe you can say– you suppose there might be other ministers that need to find Christ that are (laughs) pastors of churches?

Jim Jones:
I’m certain. In this particular orthodox movement, there are many, because they never asked me whether I knew Christ personally, they just asked me if I had a desire to help people, and of course, that is important, but we need a personal experience with Christ.

Fred Jordan:
That’s right! And that’s what we’re here for in “Church in the Home”! And now I wonder, men, if you’ll sing for Mr. and Mrs. uh–

Marceline Jones:
Jones.

Fred Jordan:
Jones!
(Organ music starts. Choir sings.)

Fred Jordan:
Thank you, quartet. And now Mr. and Mrs. Owens, we’re come that moment when you’re going to receive the– that lovely little girl. And certainly thank God for ya, and can– uh, can you hold up that little Rachel? And maybe you can take the new baby, huh? Uh. Just stand up here close and speak right up, and uh, Rachel, you can sit there on the pulpit. That’s all right. Uncle Fred doesn’t mind–
(Baby cries)

Fred Jordan:
And now uh, we’re going to hear some tears and some crying, and it’s not because these children don’t like their new parents, it’s all because it’s all so strange, and all these lights, and all these strange people, sometimes I get frightened when I look at these cameramen and– and the crew, and all the gadgets we have here, and uh, this is a great moment in your lives, and uh, for all of us here in America, we want to pray for you and thank God for your interest in taking a little baby. Lorraine Jost, our orphanage director, will you bring that little doll and– First of all, just stand here and speak up now, Lorraine. Uh– Could you tell us where this little baby came from?

Lorraine:
Well, Fred, we don’t really know where this little baby came from, because she was an abandoned baby, she was left at the city hall, and uh, we received her through the authorities there, and they brought her to us–

Fred Jordan:
The city hall in Seoul, Korea.

Lorraine:
Yes.

Fred Jordan:
That’s where you found her.

Lorraine:
Yes.

Fred Jordan: And they brought her to the orphanage. And now I want to take this– what’s her name?

Lorraine:
Her name is (Korean name).
(Baby cries)

Fred Jordan:
And I know she will want to come in that beautiful garment, but uh– and she’s crying and– And it’s not because she doesn’t like her parents, it’s because she don’t like me. And honey, we’re so glad– and there’s your little sister, Rachel, and here’s your new papa and mama. And uh, Mother, we’re happy to present this little doll uh, to you. May God bless you and– and keep you and use you and already, she’s fallen in love with them. And uh, we just thank God. Do you have any words right now?

Mr. Owens:
No, I don’t.

Mrs. Owens:
No.

Fred Jordan:
You just suppose– You don’t know what– God bless ya, thank you so much, and now we want Mrs. Braden to come and receive her little doll. You can just go this way. Thank you so much. God– Oh, come this way, they say. All right, will you come, Mrs. Braden? And this– this lovely mother’s from Denver, husband couldn’t come, and Lorraine, will you bring her little baby. Uh, give us the baby’s name.

Lorraine:
This is Pak, uh– (Korean name), and she too was–

Fred Jordan:
Speak right up, will you?

Lorraine:
This is (Korean name), and she too was just a little baby that was cast away.

Fred Jordan:
What do you mean, cast away? Just left?

Lorraine:
Just left, we don’t know where she has a mother or father or– or what.  She’s just a– an abandoned child from Korea.

Fred Jordan: Well, she’s so sweet, and these beautiful colors of red and blue and gold, and this lovely Korean uh, uh, dress. Well, could you let them see her face so they can see the little baby that came almost dying? And under careful uh, guidance of this lovely angel of God, why, uh, she’s going to new parents. And honey, you come and– and let Uncle Fred give you to your new family. Uh– She’s being torn away from one love, but uh, she’s going to another. And I know. There now, now, looky there. There’s your new mama, and Mrs. Braden, uh, do you want to say a word?

Mrs. Braden:
I’m just real thrilled.

Fred Jordan:
Are you? That’s all you can say? Well, isn’t this wonderful, and God bless that doll. Let us have one more look at her. Goodbye, darling. And we hope you have a wonderful time playing in the snow in Denver, Colorado. Thank you so much. God bless you. Mr. and Mrs. Jones, they’re receiving two children, so they’ll both have their arms full here, and he’s a pastor, and they have a nurse– uh, a home for the aged, and now two brand new babies. And I think you’ve uh, reared one or two others from– that you’ve taken in.

Jim Jones:
Three.

Fred Jordan:
Three you’ve taken in. Uh– Could I ask your age?

Jim Jones:
Yes, I’m 26– 27, I guess, and she’s 31.

Fred Jordan:
Twenty-seven, and already taken in three and all this. Oh, that’s wonderful. God bless you. And Lorraine– Can I hold you, honey? Oh, that’s wonderful. Now tell us about this girl first.

Lorraine:
Fred, this little girl [the soon-to-be Stephanie Jones] was brought to us from another Korean orphanage. She was very sick and malnutritioned there, and uh, neglected, and a– a GI saw her and had real compassion on her, and uh, asked us whether we would take her in. She had a very bad infection from a burn on her leg, and she responded beautifully to love and treatment, and we just uh– we’re so thrilled to see her have this privilege of coming to the States.

Fred Jordan:
Isn’t that wonderful? And look at that pretty doll. where did you get– Let’s let them see, you pretty doll. That’s an American doll. Isn’t that a beautiful little doll? And we’re so happy that you could be here. And uh, all you friends that’re looking at this little doll, don’t fail to pray for her. And uh, I remember when they had one ragged doll over there, with no arms, no legs. Did it have a head on it?

Lorraine:
I think it did. You could tell, it was a doll–

Fred Jordan:
It had a head, but no arms and no legs, and all of ‘em fighting over it. Uh, you’re a wonderful girl, God bless you, you are God’s angel, to have fifty little babies to take of, and we’re so happy to have this one to present to Mr. and Mrs. Jones. And now tell us about this young man.

Lorraine:
This little boy [the soon-to-be Lew Jones] also came to us as just a– an abandoned child, we don’t know anything about its parents, we uh, know that he was really neglected, and very thin when he came to us and (unintelligible word) really come out of it. We’re so glad to see him have a chance.

Fred Jordan:
It’s wonderful. I see he likes to eat, just like our little (unintelligible). And uh–

Lorraine:
They say he doesn’t have any bottom to his stomach.

Fred Jordan:
Now, why– what is this uh, veil and everything on his head?

Lorraine:
Well, this is a festive dress for the little boys in Korea. Seemingly, the little boys are favored, and they have uh, more elaborate dress than even the little girls. And uh, this is one that they wear on their first birthday and so on, at very special occasions.

Fred Jordan:
Um-hmm. That’s– That’s true of all men over in the Far East. If you men want to be men, (unintelligible under laugh) go to the Far East, ‘cause the– ‘cause the men are men there, that’s no place for a woman to wear the trousers, I’ll guarantee you. But uh, in this case, where it’s a lot of hard work, the women have do the work like Lorraine. And now both these children go to the Joneses? You sure you’re not making a mistake?

Lorraine:
No– No, I’m not making a mistake.

Fred Jordan:
We don’t want to get them mixed up. ‘Cause this is the heaviest one, so we’ll present this one to Mr.– Reverend Jones, and uh, then this little fella uh, to the mama. This is your new mama! And she’ll take care of ya, and watch over ya, and– and Daddy will watch over, and they’ll teach you about the Lord Jesus Christ, and we just praise God for every one of you precious uh, families and you children. And we ask the Lord to bless you and keep you, and I– I think that you friends uh, who have had a part will realize the necessity of us having larger quarters over in Korea. The orphanage is forty percent beyond capacity. So pray that God shall someway uh, raise up friends and meet that need. And thank God to each and every one– Don’t worry about this crying, because I, friends, have heard tears and cries before. God bless you, Mrs. Jones. And God bless you, Brother Jones, and I hope we will cross your paths many, many times. And now our choir is going to sing for us.

Fred Jordan: Thank you, choir. “And the Lord will bring back his own.” Uh, this is the little girl that I told you about that’s been in America about uh, a year, isn’t it?

Willie Jordan:
A year. Umm-hmm.

Fred Jordan:
And this is Mrs. Dirksen, and uh, she is the sister of the girl I call God’s angel, our director from Korea, uh, Lorraine Jost. And uh, what’s your name, darling?

Ruth Ann Dirksen:
(Inaudible)

Fred Jordan:
What?

Ruth Ann Dirksen:
Ruth Ann Dirksen.

Fred Jordan:
Ruth Ann Dirksen. Okay. Uh– Isn’t that wonderful? I want to see if she could talk English! And uh, is this your mommy? Huh? Can you smile for Uncle Fred? Can you smile just a little bit? And uh, how long was she in our orphanage over in Korea?

Mrs. Dirksen:
About eight or nine months.

Fred Jordan:
Eight or nine months.

Mrs. Dirksen:
Umm-hmm.

Fred Jordan:
And uh, uh– so uh– and she’s been in your home how long?

Mrs. Dirksen:
A year.

Fred Jordan:
One year. Now uh, how does she fit in with your family? You have four sons, is that right?

Mrs. Dirksen:
That’s right.

Fred Jordan:
Four boys. And you wanted a little girl.

Mrs. Dirksen:
That’s right.

Fred Jordan:
And now how does this little girl uh, fit in with your family and uh, being a mixed-blooded child?

Mrs. Dirksen:
As far as we’re concerned, and the boys, she’s no different, she’s just one of us.

Fred Jordan:
She is.

Mrs. Dirksen:
She’s the jewel in our home. (Laughs)

Fred Jordan:
(Laughs) Do you think that you love her really as much as your sons?

Mrs. Dirksen:
Yes, I’m sure the Lord has given us that love in our hearts for her.

Fred Jordan:
And do you love your mommy? Can you give her a little kiss? Huh? Give her a little kiss? (Laughs) Isn’t that pretty? Look at those beautiful feet! That’s wonderful. This is your first time in television, isn’t it?

Mrs. Dirksen:
That’s right.

Fred Jordan:
Just imagine, a child being on television who was abandoned and left uh, to die over there in Korea, and now has this lovely home. Uh– Whereabouts here in California?

Mrs. Dirksen:
We live in Reedley, near Fresno.

Fred Jordan:
Reedley, California. Near Fresno. And uh, we just thank God for you. Thank you so much, darlin’. Uh, what– what about the community? How did they receive her? The neighbors?

Mrs. Dirksen:
The folks in our community and our church, our friends and loved ones, have just taken them into her heart, or into their hearts, and they just love her dearly. Everyone has just been so kind and– and gracious to us and to her, and it’s just been a thrill to have her come into our home.

Fred Jordan:
Oh, that’s wonderful. Can you just look at her one more time and see if anybody could hate that little doll? Huh? Could you smile? (Laughs) Are you glad to be here in America? Huh? Are ya? You like your papa too? And your little– and your brothers? Oh, that’s wonderful. God bless you. Thank you so much. You may go that way.

And now I’m going to ask uh, Lorraine uh, Jost and Willie to come back and tell you something about the need there, uh, something about the custom of the lepers trying to find a little uh, baby that they can eat in order to uh, get healed, they think. So you come right now, Lorraine, and I’m going to turn this portion over to you and to Willie, and let you uh, have most of the time today and the– usually where I give a message, and let you talk out of your hearts about the need, and the people are really uh, getting quite concerned about this building, and I understand that uh, uh, there were some phone calls, one from uh, Phoenix, Arizona, a man said he wanted to help in the new building, and uh, I’m sure other friends gone be raised up until the thousands of dollars are needed uh, that uh, that we– that we– we pled for people to give.

Mr. Brett:
Reverend Jordan, I have some telegrams that just came in here a few minutes ago.

Fred Jordan:
Well, thank you, Mr. Brett. Just stay here, Mr. Brett. Uh– Since you’re here, it’s breaking the trend of thought, but we’re starting uh, in two weeks, isn’t it?

Mr. Brett:
On October the nineteenth.

Fred Jordan:
Two weeks from now we start our live telecast from the heart of downtown Los Angeles, Skid Row, for two consecutive Sundays from 11 to 12 o’clock. Is that right?

Mr. Brett:
That’s right.

Fred Jordan:
Now– now what’s the plan? We’re going to have everything live from right there.

Mr. Brett:
One hour, right from Skid Row. And we’d certainly like to ask everyone of you Christians to really pray as you’ve never prayed before, and we just hope many of those men find Christ.

Fred Jordan:
Will these men uh, be seen on television just as they come off the streets–

Mr. Brett:
Just as they come off the street, pushing baby buggies–

Fred Jordan:
Unshaven and–

Mr. Brett:
Unshaven, is right.

Fred Jordan:
And unkept, and– and they’ll see them just as they are.

Mr. Brett:
They certainly will.

Fred Jordan:
They come from the boxcars and from the streets in the jungles–

Mr. Brett:
And then we will have a service, you’ll probably see two or three hundred in our service. And we’ll have a regular altar call, and I know that many of them will find the Lord.

Fred Jordan:
Well, if it’s like it’s been every day down there, you’ll see people uh, turned away, men turned away, that are trying to get in for a meal and for a place to sleep, and for the gospel service. Thank you so much. And I’m going to turn these telegrams over to Willie, because she’s the one that uh, is going to tell you the burden that’s on our heart to alleviate the uh, problem there in– in– in the orphanages. I’m going to ask you what the problem is with the uh– with the babies because uh, I’ve been uh, uh, trying to tell the people, and I’m sure sometimes they’ve got questions. In fact, uh, this came up this week, a man asked one of our staff members, said, “Well, uh, how do we know that the money goes to Korea and to the orphans over there?” And of course this person that asked, uh, they didn’t know that this uh, director’s going to be here this week. And so our staff members said “Well, why don’t you ask the director? She’ll will arrive Saturday morning, and we’ll be glad to bring her to you, and you can ask her personally. And she’ll have children with her, and she’ll have all the evidence you need.” Uh– So uh, uh, that was a wonderful answer, I thought, uh, because here’s the evidence that uh, you get the money and that the orphans are cared for. Now how many babies do you have in this nursery? And do they actually have two in one– each crib and two on the floor under the crib?

Lorraine:
Yes, Fred, we do. We have two babies in each crib, we’ve had– we have, oh, I’d say about 25 babies under a year and a half. And uh–

Fred Jordan:
Twenty-five under a year and a half of age?

Lorraine:
Two– Two and– Two to two– a year and a half.

Fred Jordan:
It’s all I can do to change two babies that are under a year and a half.

Lorraine:
And uh, so we really do need space–

Fred Jordan:
Oh, bless your heart. I– I’m going to slip out of the picture. And Willie, you and this dear girl, you’ve been partners in– in Korea and just built the orphanage over there and you cried together and wept together, and uh, we’re so glad to let you take this time.

Willie Jordan:
Well, Lorraine, I just want to read some of these telegrams that came in, they’ll make you very happy. You know, Reverend Jordan sent some telegrams to some of our friends who’ve been faithful to stand by the children, asking them to send uh, something to help with the new building. And here’s a telegram that comes from Detroit, and it says, “Yes, I will send one hundred dollars on the orphanage.” And here is a uh, telegram from Peoria, Illinois, it says, “Mailing a one hundred dollar check.” And uh, I can’t tell where this is from– Oh, from Canada, British Columbia, Canada, fifty dollar money order in today’s air mail, regarding Lorraine Jost Korea. Notify me on arrival of money. Well, you’ll have the privilege of answering all of these letters that come in while you’re here, and maybe you can get some time to thank all these people. And here’s another one, request granted, one hundred dollar check coming today. Another one, 25 dollar check off today. And I know that there are more here, Lorraine, here’s another one, we’ll send fifty dollars, answering your telegram, yes, one hundred dollars on the way. We thank God for all of these people who have sent, and I know that it will help towards the thousands of dollars that we need for this new addition. Now tell us another reason. You said you have all these tiny babies in a crib? Why else do you need more space?

Lorraine:
Well, (unintelligible word) we need more space for the older children. They just don’t have the room that they need for their study time, and everything, and they just are– they feel defin– I feel definitely that they would have better opportunities if they could have more space and a little more privacy for themselves.

Willie Jordan:
Now, these are some of the older children that will not be adopted to America, and they must grow up in Korea, and they must get their education there, and make their way in life.

Lorraine:
Yes.

Willie Jordan:
And they will be at the orphanage until they’re eighteen years of age.

Lorraine:
That’s right.

Willie Jordan:
Well, this is some of God’s answer right here. I might explain to you, friends, about the orphanage in Korea. We first came back in 1955 and asked you to pray that God would provide the money for a building there, and in January of 1956, I returned to Korea and lived there with Lorraine Jost in the little room that Reverend Jordan’s told you about. I remember very fondly many days and nights there that we prayed for God to give us just the right contractor to construct the building. We had only a limited amount of funds to spend for this orphanage, and we prayed many, many nights that God would bless you people in America who had given, and we prayed for God to raise up new friends to provide all the needs of the children there. And so we constructed this building, thinking only of the emergency need right at that moment, just of a place to cover them and a place to keep them warm, and how proud we were when that building was finished.

And after almost six months in Korea, Lorraine and I stood and– with some Christian friends– Christian Korean friends and dedicated this building, and when we left, we saw it full of children. But now, because of the need and because Lorraine just can’t say no to any baby that’s brought to her, some abandoned child that’s sick, and she knows if she says no and that baby is turned away, that that baby will die. She can’t say no, and so, in spite of the limited facilities there, she has continued to take children. And now we told her that we would help, and that we would construct additional buildings there. We must at least double the capacity of this orphanage so the children can be cared for properly, so that she won’t have to say no to any children if– Lorraine, one of the reasons that you must take these children, we’ve told our friends about a letter that you sent just a few weeks ago.

One of the reasons you must rescue these children from the streets who are dying is because of the lepers. Now explain to us why uh– I read that letter, and I know it sounded so horrible, some of our friends that heard it– why do you uh, want to take these children so the lepers won’t get them? What would they do?

Lorraine:
Well, Willie, if the leper would uh– the superstition, I should say, in Korea is the fact that if they eat young flesh, the leper can be cured of his leprosy. It’s definitely superstition, and nothing– no medical findings to confirm it, and they say that the– especially the liver of a very small child is the– the choice part that they want. And uh, I’ve heard of people seeing lepers just tearing the limbs of a small child, eating it right on the streets of Seoul. Now, this doesn’t happen often, but it is something to consider in uh, this land where there is so much superstition, and so much uh, fear of death and all, and certainly we– we want to teach those children the truth about Christianity so that they might be able to really know Christ and live with him.

Willie Jordan: Well, Lorraine, you not only take uh, full Korean children, but you take Korean children who have been fathered by members of the Occupation Forces, not only United States servicemen, but servicemen from other countries. Now tell us a little about these children, why it’s so necessary that you accept them into the home and not turn any of them away.

Lorraine:
Well, Willie, these children are really kicked around in Korea, they’re not wanted. They’re– They are our product of war, we might say, but they’re also product of sin and everyone knows it, and they’re children that have no other place to turn but to– to homes that are open in America and so on, and someone who will take them off the streets and give them a chance. And uh, oftentimes they’re used as money bribes and so on, so that the mothers might be able to make a little more money in Seoul, but uh, they are so needed– so needing in opportunities to– to be taken, and that– so that they can have a home and also uh, find uh, a real love in the– that the– only parents could give– (voice breaks) I’m sorry, Willie!

Willie Jordan:
I’m sure you can see how nervous Lorraine is this morning! You see, she’s used to taking care of fifty babies. They don’t have a television set at the orphanage, they don’t have seven channels like we have here in Los Angeles to tune to. They have only one mission there, and that’s to care for these children. And these lights and cameras make you a little nervous, I understand even one lady wrote you who helped sponsor the children, and said don’t be nervous. You see, we brought Lorraine to you this morning to let you see some of the products of your labors and of your gifts and your prayers. And I know that Lorraine is thankful to you. Thank you, Lorraine, for being with us.

Lorraine:
Willie–

Willie Jordan:
And next Lord’s day, we’ll have you on again.

Lorraine:
Willie, I do want to thank them personally for all that they’ve done, the clothes that they’ve sent, and the– the money, and all their prayers. Oh, it’s just more than I can really express, Willie, it’s just– and my heart is just full and overflowing because of what you folks here in America have done for us in Korea.

Willie Jordan:
Thank you, Lorraine. And I know that you in America are thankful for what Lorraine Jost has done, not only for these children that you saw here today being presented to their new parents, but you’re thankful for what she’s doing, for all the children, that are brought to her and to Ginny Suderman [phonetic]. Today Ginny serves there alone, because Lorraine will be here in America for just two weeks, because of the urgent need for the building there. Because the fact that this building must be constructed, the must have additional quarters before winter, Lorraine is returning. She’s been gone from America over four years. She’s in desperate need of a rest. And I’m sure that she would like to enjoy just a few of the luxuries here in America. We call them necessities of life. But to Lorraine and Ginny and those babies there in Korea who have so little, our necessities are sheer luxury. But she will not be able to stay here, she will see her father, and her family whom she has not seen for over four years for just two brief days. And the rest of the time while she’s here will be spent in planning for this new building and going over all the construction of plans for the new building. We cannot send Lorraine back empty-handed. I lived with this girl there in Korea for almost six months. I spent day and night with her, planning for the building that she now has there, caring for these children. I have seen her love these children. I’ve seen her stay up night after night caring for sick ones. I’ve seen sick children brought to her ready to die, and I’ve seen the little graves, with the white crosses, the only marker there on a little mound. And you could tell by the length of the mound the size of the child that Lorraine Jost, just a young lady here, a registered nurse sent to Korea, had to bury herself. She has to be a mother and a father, a director, take care of all the business, she has to be a nurse and a doctor, she’s even delivered babies herself without the care of a doctor or delivery room. She also has to bury those that are brought to her too late. But we must not let this happen again. We must provide for her and for these children the facilities that she so desperately needs. We told her, yes, we of “Church in the Home”– Our “Church in the Home” family in America will respond, we know they will, Lorraine, because they have in the past.

(Organ music begins)

Willie Jordan:
Today you heard from her lips, how grateful she is, you’ve seen these children, who were brought dying and starving, and you’ve seen them, healthy, happy babies this morning because Lorraine and Ginny nursed them back to health. Will you provide the building that’s so desperately needed to nourish and care for the other children that’re being brought to them every day? Will you today, your family, will you accept the responsibility of just five dollars for this building? Only five dollars. It won’t buy very much here in America, but in Korea, it will help put up the blocks for that building, it’ll help put the tile on the roof to keep these children warm through the winter months when we will be so comfortable here, it will provide a building for them. Will you sacrifice today for this young lady and for the children who no one else loves? That address is Fred Jordan, Box 69, Los Angeles, California. Every dime that you send will return with Lorraine for the building.

(Organ music. Soloist sings “Just as I Am”)

Fred Jordan: Thank you so much, Lily. “Just as I Am.” That song’s talking about our giving ourselves to Christ. We haven’t had a message or sermon today, but I’m sure your hearts have been stirred with the testimonies of the parents and the presentations of the babies and God’s angel of mercy here. You want to say one word? You’re gonna be staying here a few days before you go back to Korea?

Lorraine:
Well, Fred, I’d like to say this to our friends and– and loved ones out there that I really want them to pray for the babies and the children at the home, and for Ginny Suderman, she’s such a precious woman that’s come over to help me, and for me as we work there with them, as we show them the love of Christ.

Fred Jordan:
Our office manager has just presented me with this beautiful picture, and we want you to have one for every room in the orphanage. Here it is, and we’re going to furnish one for every room in the orphanage, and he also says that we can make available to every one of our friends this picture, if you write to me this week, “Church in the Home” or Fred Jordan, Box 69, Los Angeles, California. They too– every one of our “Church in the Home” friends and members can have this picture, including a paper uh– the special edition of– for the orphanage and about the orphans uh, that you have there. God bless you. Pray for this precious girl now. Will you do it? Remember her in your prayers. Shall we bow our heads together? Good-bye and God bless you until the same time next week.

(Choir sings.)

Announcer:
This has been “Church in the Home,” with your radio and television pastor, Reverend Fred Jordan. If you have a problem or a prayer request, Reverend Jordan invites you to write so he might personally pray for your request. Send your letter to Box 69, Los Angeles, California. “Church in the Home” sponsors the World Wide Faith Ministry, consisting of schools, orphanages, missionaries, and mission stations throughout the world.

(Choir sings.)

End of tape.

Tape originally posted January 2011

Originally posted on June 16th, 2013.

Last modified on February 18th, 2016.
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